History of the Social Security Disability Insurance Program

For millions of Americans who live with a chronic illness or disability, the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program is essential for survival. Every year the Social Security Administration (SSA) receives around 2 million applications from individuals seeking benefits. Unfortunately, the SSA has gained a reputation for being complex, tedious, and difficult to work with. This often results in a painstaking process for applicants that most often ends with their applications being denied. 

In most cases, an applicant’s best shot at being accepted into the SSDI program is working with a skilled social security disability lawyer who can guide them through the application process, as well as support them in the event of an appeal.

Origins of the SSDI Program

The SSDI program has been a valuable resource since it was first enacted in 1956. The program is funded using worker payroll taxes that go toward the SSDI Trust Fund, and the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) Trust Fund. In 1967, there was an actuarial deficiency in the SSDI Trust Fund, forcing Congress to reconsider the true definition of what it means to have a disability. 

To be considered eligible to receive SSDI benefits, one must prove their inability to work due to an illness or medical condition that is terminal, life-threatening, or will impair one’s ability to work for at least one year. With the new, stricter guidelines put in place, more and more individuals have found themselves fighting the SSA to receive the funds their family needs to survive. Social security lawyers began practicing to provide support for individuals and their families, to ensure that they receive the financial support that is paramount to paying for basic needs such as food and housing.

Social Security Disability Lawyer

If you are lucky enough to have your application approved, you can expect to begin receiving payment after your five-month waiting period is over. You will continue receiving your benefits for as long as you remain disabled, or until you reach retirement age. If you are still disabled at the time of retirement, your benefits will be automatically transferred over to regular Social Security retirement benefits.

Unfortunately, most SSDI applications are denied for a variety of reasons. If you are unable to work and require support through SSDI, it is in your best interest to contact a social security lawyer prior to filling out and submitting your application. An experienced social security lawyer will assist you in properly filling out your application, compiling the required medical documentation, and in the event your application is still denied, they will support you through the appeals process. 

If you are planning to file for SSDI benefits, we encourage you to contact us for a free case evaluation. Please fill out the form below, and a legal assistant will be in touch with you shortly to discuss the details of your case, and determine if working with a social security lawyer would be right for you!

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